Citizenship Services

Welcome to the Citizenship and Passport Unit of the U.S. Embassy Georgetown.

 

What Service Do You Require?

U.S. citizens are REQUIRED to schedule an appointment online for all Citizenship and Passport Services as well as for Notarials and Authentication services. We are unable to accommodate walk-in applications. NOTE: Applicants who arrive more than 30 minutes late for their appointment will be required to reschedule their appointment online.

U.S Citizens picking up Federal Benefits checks, processed passports and Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) may do so on any Monday through Thursday from 10:00 a.m to 11:00 a.m..

Please e-mail the American Citizen Services Section at acsgeorge@state.gov if you would like to request an appointment to renounce your U.S citizenship.

A. THE IMMIGRATION & NATIONALITY ACT

Section 349(a)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (8 U.S.C. 1481(a)(5) is the section of law governing the right of a United States citizen to renounce his or her U.S. citizenship. That section of law provides for the loss of nationality by voluntarily

“(5) making a formal renunciation of nationality before a diplomatic or consular officer of the United States in a foreign state , in such form as may be prescribed by the Secretary of State” (emphasis added).

B. ELEMENTS OF RENUNCIATION

A person wishing to renounce his or her U.S. citizenship must voluntarily and with intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship:

1. appear in person before a U.S. consular or diplomatic officer,

2. in a foreign country (normally at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate); and

3. sign an oath of renunciation

Renunciations that do not meet the conditions described above have no legal effect. Because of the provisions of Section 349(a)(5), U.S. citizens cannot effectively renounce their citizenship by mail, through an agent, or while in the United States. In fact, U.S. courts have held certain attempts to renounce U.S. citizenship to be ineffective on a variety of grounds, as discussed below.

C. REQUIREMENT – RENOUNCE ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES

A person seeking to renounce U.S. citizenship must renounce all the rights and privileges associated with such citizenship. In the case of Colon v. U.S. Department of State , 2 F.Supp.2d 43 (1998),the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia rejected Colon’s petition for a writ of mandamus directing the Secretary of State to approve a Certificate of Loss of Nationality in the case because he wanted to retain the right to live in the United States while claiming he was not a U.S. citizen.

D. DUAL NATIONALITY / STATELESSNESS

Persons intending to renounce U.S. citizenship should be aware that, unless they already possess a foreign nationality, they may be rendered stateless and, thus, lack the protection of any government. They may also have difficulty traveling as they may not be entitled to a passport from any country. Even if not stateless, former U.S. citizens would still be required to obtain a visa to travel to the United States, or show that they are eligible for admission pursuant to the terms of the Visa Waiver Pilot Program (VWPP). Renunciation of U.S. citizenship may not prevent a foreign country from deporting that individual to the United States in some non-citizen status.

E. TAX & MILITARY OBLIGATIONS /NO ESCAPE FROM PROSECUTION

Persons who wish to renounce U.S. citizenship should be aware of the fact that renunciation of U.S. citizenship may have no effect whatsoever on his or her U.S. tax or military service obligations (contact the Internal Revenue Service or U.S. Selective Service for more information). In addition, the act of renouncing U.S. citizenship does not allow persons to avoid possible prosecution for crimes which they may have committed in the United States, or escape the repayment of financial obligations previously incurred in the United States or incurred as United States citizens abroad.

F. RENUNCIATION FOR MINOR CHILDREN/INCOMPETENTS

Citizenship is a status that is personal to the U.S. citizen. Therefore parents may not renounce the citizenship of their minor children. Similarly, parents/legal guardians may not renounce the citizenship of individuals who are mentally incompetent. Minors seeking to renounce their U.S. citizenship must demonstrate to a consular officer that they are acting voluntarily and that they fully understand the implications/consequences attendant to the renunciation of U.S. citizenship.

G. IRREVOCABILITY OF RENUNCIATION

Finally, those contemplating a renunciation of U.S. citizenship should understand that the act is irrevocable, except as provided in Ssection 351 of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1483 and cannot be canceled or set aside absent successful administrative or judicial appeal. (Section 351(b) of the INA provides that an applicant who renounced his or her U.S. citizenship before the age of eighteen can have that citizenship reinstated if he or she makes that desire known to the Department of State within six months after attaining the age of eighteen. See also Title 22, Code of Federal Regulations, section 50.20).

Renunciation is the most unequivocal way in which a person can manifest an intention to relinquish U.S. citizenship. Please consider the effects of renouncing U.S. citizenship, described above, before taking this serious and irrevocable action.

 

Parents who are U.S. citizens at the time of their child’s birth in Guyana may be able to transmit U.S. citizenship to their child.

In order to process a child’s claim to U.S. citizenship, the U.S. parent must establish that s/he is the biological parent, present proof of sufficient physical presence in the U.S., and evidence to confirm the child’s identity.   In certain cases, the consular officer may require additional documentation.

  • Applicants MUST schedule an appointment for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad online. Click HERE to do so.
  • Applications must be made in person.

THE FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS MUST BE PRESENTED AT THE TIME OF THE APPLICATION:

1.   Child’s Guyanese Birth Certificate

2.   Parents’ Marriage Certificate – Certified copies are acceptable if issued in the U.S.

3.   Evidence of dissolution of previous marriages.  If applicable, divorce decrees or death certificates of any prior marriages of either parent should be presented.  These certificates should be originals.  Certified copies are only accepted if issued in the U.S.

4.   Evidence of parent’s U.S. citizenship – Naturalization Certificate, Certificate of Citizenship or U.S. Passport. (only certified copies are accepted)

5.   Proof of Identification of Foreign Parent – National Identification Card or Passport.

6.   Fees:  The total fee is $100.00 for the consular report of birth application. Fees may be paid in U.S. dollars or the equivalent in Guyanese dollars.  The entire fee must be paid in one currency.  Credit Card payments are accepted.  The fee is non-refundable.

7.   Proof of Physical Presence in the United States.    The Immigration and Nationality Act specifies that in order to transmit citizenship to a child, the U.S. citizen parent must have been physically present in the United States for a specific amount of time prior to the child’s birth.  (Note: If both parents are U.S. citizens, no proof of physical presence is required.)

  • If you were a single mother at the time of your child’s birth you only need to present proof of one year continuous physical presence in the United States prior to the child’s birth.
  • If only one of the parents is an American citizen:

and the child was born before November 14, 1986: the American citizen would have to present proof that he/she was physically present in the United States or its outlying possessions for a period or periods totaling not less than ten years prior to the child’s birth, at least five of which were after attaining the age of fourteen years.

and the child was born after November 14, 1986: the American citizen would have to present proof that he/she was physically present in the United States or its outlying possessions for a period or periods totaling not less than five years prior to the child’s birth, at least two of which were after attaining the age of fourteen years.

NOTE: If the U.S. citizen parent transmitting citizenship to the child is not present, he or she may complete Form DS-5507 (PDF 36 KB) – Affidavit of Parentage Physical Presence and Support and submit separately.  The parent completing this application provides as much information on the parent completing Form DS-5507 as he or she has). Click to view a Sample DS-5507 (PDF 2.3 MB).

8.   Application Forms. Use BLACK INK. 

  • Affidavit of Parentage and Physical Presence Form. Download from the internet athttp://www.state.gov/documents/organization/126018.pdf (PDF 36 KB).   The U.S. citizen parent must detail dates and places where s/he has resided or visited since the day s/he was born, indicating purpose of trips, vacations, residence, business, studies, U.S. military service, etc…This form is divided into two main sections:

The upper portion asks for all the times that you have been physically present in the United States since the day of your own birth.  Continue on separate sheet, if necessary.

The lower portion asks for all the times that you have been physically present abroad (anywhere outside the United States) since the day of your own birth. Continue on separate sheet, if necessary.

9.     When filing a Report of Birth application both parents and the child should be present

If the U.S. citizen parent has passed away: the original death certificate of that parent must be submitted.